Environment: Air: Lead

The overall U.S. lead emissions in parts per million with a standard of 1.5ppm over a 3 month period. Lead can come into the body in a number of ways: through water that goes through lead pipes, through badly canned food and through small pieces of paint.
The overall U.S. lead emissions in parts per million with a standard of 1.5ppm over a 3 month period.  Lead can come into the body in a number of ways: through water that goes through lead pipes, through badly canned food and through small pieces of paint.  

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Changes in Lead Pollution Limits
Published Thursday, October 16th, 2008

Since 1978, the Environmental Protection Agency has enforced same limits on lead in our air at 1.5 ug/m3 (micrograms per cubic meter). Issued by the National Resources Defense Council as part of the lawsuit brought on by the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, the Agency has announced it will increase the limits by 90% to 0.15 ug/m3.

This new limit would slash emissions from smelters, metal mines, iron and steel foundries, waste incinerators and general aviation gasoline. The standard called for a 3 month average for lead emissions which meant that the companies would have the ability to disperse lead in short spikes. Companies have until 2011 to comply with the new standard and based on the EPA’s air quality data collected from 2004-2006 at least 14 counties in the US could be in violation.

Lead pollution in the U.S has been on a steady decrease since 1980 except for spikes in 2001-2003. The new standard will decrease the level of human absorption which can lead to childhood nervous disorders and mental growth. Currently the U.S. pumps nearly 1,300 tons of lead into the environment.

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Learn More

Environmental Protection Agency: Lead - http://www.epa.gov/oar/urbanair/lead/index.html
Levels of the pollutant - "lead" - in the air have decreased dramatically since 1978, primarily due to reductions in emissions from cars and trucks. Today, metal processing plants are generally responsible for most of the lead in the air.

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EPA: Lead - http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/lead/index.html
Lead is a highly toxic metal that was used for many years in products found in and around our homes. Lead may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death.